Frequently Asked Questions

What are your staff’s qualifications?

  • Speech Language Pathologists: Have a minimum of a Master’s degree. Meet requirements for Certification of Clinical Competence issued by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and licensure by the State of California Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology Board.
  • Speech Language Pathology Assistants: Have a minimum of a Bachelor’s degree and hold a license issued by the State of California Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology Board.
  • Occupational Therapists: Have a minimum of a Master’s degree. Meet requirements for Certification of Clinical Competence issued to the National Board of Occupational Therapy and licensure by the State of California Board of Occupational Therapy.

What will my child’s evaluation look like?

  • Typically, evaluations are scheduled for 1-1.5 hours. Please arrive at least 15 minutes early to ensure all paperwork is in order so we can get started on time. You are welcome to attend the evaluation with your child, however, we understand sometimes kids do better on their own. Evaluations will include standardized testing (if possible), clinical observations, chart review and parental interview. Evaluation write-ups are usually completed within 2-3 weeks after the evaluation is completed.

What will my child’s treatment look like?

  • Treatment usually occurs 1-2 x weekly (1 hour for OT, 30 min -1 hour for ST) depending on therapist’s recommendations and billing source. You and your child’s therapist will work out if it is best for you to attend treatment with your child. All treatment occurs from a developmental play based model, so it should be fun! Treatment occurs in individual rooms or large gym space depending on your child’s needs. Each treatment session will be followed up with parent education at the end of treatment.

How long will my child need treatment?

  •  Treatment time varies according to each child’s specific needs and family’s concerns.

Does my child have an articulation disorder?

  • A child with an articulation disorder often has difficulty with the physical production of speech sounds. An articulation disorder is often characterized by difficulty with the motoric aspect of speech, such as incorrect placement of the tongue, teeth, lips or soft palate during speech.

When does a child need speech therapy?

  • Some children may have difficulty producing certain sounds, combining words, forming sentences, asking/responding to questions, following directions and using language in a functional, meaningful and productive manner. Although some children may outgrow this problem, others will need to see a speech therapist to correct it.

How do I know if my child has a sensory processing disorder?

  • Your evaluating therapist will be able to answer all of your questions regarding sensory processing and sensory integration and how it relates to your child. If you want to read up on it before hand, please refer to the websites and books listed in our resources section.